Windows 10 Mobile on the way out!

Screen Shot 2018-01-02 at 3.17.20 PM.pngAfter many years of significant invest, Microsoft has announced that Windows 10 Mobile will no longer be a focus for the company.   Though, they will continue to release bug fixes in the near term.  Microsoft was early in the mobile space with its CE operating system but was caught unprepared for the launch of Apple iOS in 2007 followed by Google Android in 2008.

At this time Microsoft has not achieved any appreciable market share:

  • Microsoft 1.3%
  • Android 64%
  • iOS 34%

The device partners did deliver good equipment, but at the center of the failed strategy was the target focused on chasing a large volume of applications at the expense of all quality.   Each year excessive amounts of incentive money were poured into developer incentive programs, literally buying apps for the app store,  there was no emphasis placed on quality.   So the store quickly earned a bad reputation.   The advertising platform was also a crippling factor in not being able to adequately support apps that were popular.

The missed opportunity was in not leveraging Microsoft’s enterprise strength.   Microsoft was already starting far behind Apple and Google.   By blindly chasing a parity play of consumer applications they were guaranteed to always be trailing and created no real incentive for a consumer to switch platform.   A consumer app based store was always a long-term play that could have developed over the long term.  If Microsoft could have built the 10 – 20 most critical enterprise applications that supported back-office integration, dashboards, reporting, and integration into critical 3rd party enterprise software it may have become the indispensable device for all corporate employees.  It could have been licensed in packages with existing enterprise software.   It may have created a market of its own that everyone else would struggle to catch up.

Now history has been written,   goodbye windows mobile….

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UST: Risk Leadership at PWC

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With Elements Group holding a board position on the UST Risk Leadership Team,  we enjoyed attending the first fall forum and panel discussion.   On stage, were several risk leaders from companies in the twin cities area and PWC practitioners.  The interaction with the audience was very open and it created a nice atmosphere of discussion.   Also, each panelist was asked to comment on each question, so we were able to get insights from different perspectives and environments.   This is the 1st of an ongoing series and I’m looking forward to the spring event.  The overall tone of the first meeting was pretty much in the trenches risk management, but the overall theme of risk leadership also moves into areas about the risk of not acting and innovating for organizations.   Hopefully, this more proactive role will come into focus as the series progresses.

After the panel discussion, food was served and the attendees enjoyed the rooftop PWC patio overlooking the MSP downtown.  There practitioners and students were able to network, discuss the learnings from the panel and begin to form a community that will be involved in future events.  The overall tone of the first meeting was pretty much in the trenches risk management, but the overall theme of risk leadership also moves into areas about the risk of not acting and innovating for organizations.   Hopefully, this more proactive role will come into focus as the series progresses.

See more pictures of the event in the photo gallery

You can learn more about this initiative at the UST Risk Leadership site

Tim Pawlenty Speaks on the 4th Industrial Revolution

Screen Shot 2018-01-01 at 4.38.57 PM.pngThe St. Paul chamber hosted a speaking event featuring former governor Tim Pawlenty focused on the 4th industrial revolution.  The talked covered a broad range of topics including automation, big data, globalization, etc.   After the talk, he stayed to engage in 1:1 dialogue with attendees.

These trends will create large changes in the workforce over the next ten years.  Both in re-tooling existing personnel and in the transformation of education systems that will be required.   What isn’t clear during Q&A is if Minnesota currently leadership has a plan or vision for its future.  Hopefully, in the future MN will take up the challenge.

See more images of the event in the photo gallery

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